RRSO IV

22 April 2006
Thackerville, Oklahoma

Oklahoma
(On Road)
18.0
20.0

Texas
(At Home)
Bd
Player
Pre
Post
Score
Pre
Post
Player
Pre Post
Pre Post
01
1948
1943
0.0
2.0
2262
2267
1948
1943
2262
2267
02
1958
1949
0.0
2.0
2222
2228
1958
1949
2222
2228
03
1933
1922
0.0
2.0
2102
2111
1933
1922
2102
2111
04
1890
1872
0.0
2.0
1926
1943
1890
1872
1926
1943
05
1883
1896
1.5
0.5
1926
1914
1883
1896
1926
1914
06
1894
1896
1.0
1.0
1923
1921
1894
1896
1923
1921
07
1800
1803
1.0
1.0
1845
1842
1800
1803
1845
1842
08
1729
1736
1.0
1.0
1818
1813
1729
1736
1818
1813
09
1677
1687
1.0
1.0
1810
1801
1677
1687
1810
1801
10
1715
1716
1.0
1.0
1723
1722
1715
1716
1723
1722
11
1648
1647
1.0
1.0
1639
1641
1648
1647
1639
1641
12
1624
1651
2.0
0.0
1600
1600
1624
1651
1600
1600
13
1615
1635
2.0
0.0
1508
1485
1615
1635
1508
1485
14
1558
1564
1.5
0.5
1441
1434
1558
1564
1441
1434
15
1477
1484
1.5
0.5
1373
1365
1477
1484
1373
1365
16
1377
1244
0.0
2.0
1331
1361
1377
1244
1331
1361
17
1354
1349
1.0
1.0
1314
1319
1354
1349
1314
1319
18
1288
1273
0.5
1.5
1254
1338
1288
1273
1254
1338
19
1300
1309
2.0
0.0
0936
0924
1300
1309
0936
0924

2006 Love County Open

22 April 2006
Thackerville, Oklahoma

#
Player
St
Pre
Post
Rd01
Rd02
Total
01
OK
1231
1200
L02
W02
1.0
02
TX
0912
0951
W01
L01
1.0

RRSO IV Photos

None were taken
(as far as we know)

RRSO IV Games

Will be added shortly

The Phone Rang

By  Jim Hollingsworth
RRSO Co-Founder

     It had been a busy day at work.  In fact all days were busy (and long).  I used to have a job that supported the family, yet allowed time to do things with them.  And I could play chess.  That all changed on October 13, 2005 when I found a sealed letter my wife had left on my pillow.  That's the day a lot of things changed for both myself and a lot of people close to me.  And the 95 hour work weeks meant a lot less time for chess.

     After a hundred years (maybe a little less) in the Individual Ready Reserve (IRR) I was reactivated and using my business analyst skills to provide decision support for a Two Star Command in support of the Global War on Terrorism.  In my section we mobilized, deployed and redeployed a LOT of Army Reserves, Sailors, and Airmen.  Things worked in cycles.  For up to a month (maybe) the pace was manageable.  Then things ramped up for about three months.  That meant 95 hour work weeks were the norm.  Sometimes I was so tired I would fall asleep driving back to my quarters.  One time that happened six times on the same trip.  But, I'm still here to tell about it.

     This story happened during one of those weeks.

     The phone rang.  I better answer it.  Could be important.

     "Major Hollingsworth speaking, Sir!"

     "Hey, Jim!  This is Tom!  We won!"

     "We won, Tom C (Tom Crane)?"  Wow!  Great!"

     "Yeah!  We're all here at the Two Frogs Grill enjoying the annual Victory Dinner.  Everybody's here.  You want to talk to Aurelio?

     "Yeah!  Put him on!"

     "Hey, Jim!  We won!"

     "That's what I hear!  What was the final score?"

     "Twenty to eighteen.  It was close to the very end.  We almost lost.  They played very tough!"

     "Wow!"

     "Hey, Julie's here.  She wants to talk."

     And so it went.  They passed the phone around the table.  I talked with all of them. Nick.  Paul.  Helen.  Helen's daughter, Courtney.  Carmen.  Robert.  Kevin.  And everyone else there.

     When I got my orders I was given only thirty days to get all my affairs in order.  That included setting up RRSO IV with a Texas location as far north on I-35 as possible.  This would reduce Oklahoma's travel burden.  Long story short:  Thackerville, Oklahoma was just north of the Red River and had the only suitable playing site.  It was only after I had the final details nailed down and approved by both team captains that I resigned as Watauga Chess Club Secretary.  Everyone seemed a little shocked when I told them and none of us knew for sure if I would be back.

     My orders said "Iraq" and I wanted to go and do my part.  A lot of people tried getting out of deploying to Iraq.  Half had valid hardship reasons, such as a seriously ill spouse and five young children at home.  I felt sorry for them.  The other half consisted of liars, cheats, and scoundrels and I've said enough about them.  For me, Iraq was always an ultimate destination and I wanted to go.  The Army looked closely at my skills and changed plans.

     Sometimes, the littlest things have the biggest impact and change lives forever.  A first kiss.  The first time holding hands.  A tiny granddaughter running up to hug you around your knees.  An unopened envelope on a pillow.  An unexpected phone call from friends letting you know  .  .  .  .

     .  .  .  .  they remember.